Time is not uniform!

Time is not uniform!

Time, although invented by people, is a concept that often reflects consistency. After all, if there is anything that we can rely on to always be accurate, it must be our time telling devices.

Time is a human-made illusion which gives our lives the uniformity and predictability we all feel so comfortable with. However, time is not uniform.

What this means is that time, like everything else in life, is not precise. Have you ever wondered where the central base of time is coming from? Have you ever questioned the accuracy of time?

There are many questions and few answers to this issue, even though we assume it to be entirely precise.

Research now done by us at The Order Of The Iron Phoenix has yielded something revolutionary!

What we did was take two electronic timers that measure time in billiseconds. We started our timer when the universal clock located at time.windows.com hit a certian time. We started our timers at exactly 3:00:00.00 Eastern Time. We stopped our timers at 3:00:00:00 the following day (the program we used did it automatically, actually).

The results were actually stunning. After repeating the experiment 12 times, we had an exact average discrepancy of about 1/55 billionths of a second. We can therefore conclude that time is not uniform and that every day is approximately 1/55 billionths of a second longer than the day before it!

So let us summarize:

  • Time is not uniform, but fluctuates by a very small, negligible intervals.
  • Over time, this small amount can add up to minutes, and eventually hours.
  • There is no standard depicture of time, time has no basis in reality.

So we can conclude by simply saying that our experiment can be repeated over and over, and the result will always show that the following day is slightly longer than the day before it.

Where are we heading?
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